Available in:

Victims? No. Microsoft Word - Document1 Microsoft Word - Document1

Oral history project undertaken for the Tung Jung Association of New Zealand

Filename: ( not available for download )

Victims? No.  Opportunists? Probably. 
Controllers of their own fate? Definitely Yes
 
The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the perspectives represented 
in the oral history interviews that have been conducted for the New Zealand 
Tung Jung Association.  Thanks must go to the Ministry of Culture and 
Heritage for funding the project and to Megan Hutchings of the Ministry of 
Culture and Heritage for her help and advice; Linda Evans and Gillian 
Headifen of the Oral History Centre of the Alexander Turnbull Library for their 
assistance; Judith Fyfe for her inspiration and teaching; and Henry Chan and 
Allen Chang for their advice and support. 
 
Background: 
 
The Chinese in New Zealand originally came from the Guangdong Province in 
the southern part of China.  Although New Zealand developed a policy of 
exclusion and imposed a poll tax on Chinese migrants in 1881, many still 
came to New Zealand to search for the “new gold mountain” which would 
enable them to provide a better life for their families back home.  Many came, 
started up businesses when the gold ran out, and sent money back to China.  
Some returned to China to marry and to tell the news of their fortunes to 
relatives and friends in their native villages. 
 
Life was difficult for migrants from China during the first part of the C20th, but 
some with foresight, applied for naturalisation and citizenship which meant 
exemption from the poll tax.  Most Chinese did not intend to remain in New 
Zealand.  Children born to these sojourners were taken back, to the ancestral 
homes to be educated in the Confucian ways and to learn Chinese. Chinese 
boys, born in New Zealand, were expected to marry Chinese wives but were 
often sent back to New Zealand, without their wives and families to carry on 
the family business  which had been started by the fathers in New Zealand. 
 
Brothers, cousins and extended families learned through the grapevine that 
there was a country that offered opportunities that could never be had in 
China.  Soon, those who were able to afford to pay the poll tax and the boat 
fare to New Zealand, began to travel back and forth from China telling their 
stories and generating interest in this English speaking colony.  Despite the 
deterrent of the poll tax, Chinese continued to come to New Zealand, even 
when the government restricted the entry of Chinese women.  Chinese 
children born in New Zealand in the first decades of the C20th were New 
Zealand citizens by birth.  Many of these children returned to China but were 
unable to bring their wives, husbands or children to New Zealand until the 
Second World War when the government of the time allowed family 
reunification.  This move was in recognition of China’s resistance to the 
Japanese invasion in Asia when China became an ally of Britain. 
 
This group of Chinese however, were considered aliens and not permitted to 
become citizens of New Zealand until the legislation changed in 1952.  Many 
of these people came to and grew up in a society that was said to be 
sometimes hostile, often unwelcoming, but they kept a low profile and 
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
1
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 


prospered in spite of the many barriers that were placed in front of them either 
formally or informally. 
 
There has been a great deal of interest in New Zealand Chinese history in the 
last 10 years.  This was probably ignited by the New Zealand Chinese 
Association’s commissioning of Nigel’s Murphy’s research into the poll tax 
legislation in 1995-6.  Since then, the political and historical debates about 
Chinese in New Zealand have been influenced by: 
 
•  the apology of the Prime Minister in 2002 to the Poll Tax Descendents 
for the imposition of the poll tax and the consultation rounds following 
the announcement,  
•  the challenges to the established Chinese community from large 
influxes of Chinese students and migrants to NZ since 1986,  
•  the announcement in 2004 of a $5 million compensation package to 
the Chinese community for the alleged consequences of the poll tax 
imposed in 1881. 
 
When I set out to interview Chinese New Zealanders who had come to New 
Zealand for a better life, it was to assist Henry Chan in his study of migration 
patterns of Chinese coming to Australasia in the C19th and earlier part of the 
C20th.  In my naivety, I thought it would be a simple matter of getting people 
from the Tung Jung community to identify relatives or friends to talk about 
their journeys from China to New Zealand and their settlement here.   
 
However, there were a couple of factors that I had not considered. 
 
•  The reticence of Chinese people to talk about their lives to someone 
who was not family.  I may be accused of over generalising here but 
Chinese people on the whole do not open up to people they do not 
know intimately to talk about themselves.  This has meant that I have 
had to find people that I know or who have known my family or my 
husband’s family.  In a way that has been helpful because we share a 
common background but it may have left unanswered some of the 
questions that could have been asked to give more depth to the 
interview.   
 
•  The scarcity of Chinese New Zealanders from the Jung Seng District in 
the 80-90 year age group who were born in China.  When I approached 
several people in their 90s, 80s and 70s to see if they would be willing 
to talk, I was surprised by the fact that they had been born in New 
Zealand.  Because they had been taken “home” to China by their 
parents to get a Chinese education, I had assumed that they had been 
born in China.  However, many of the older generation are New 
Zealand born.  This means that there must have been Chinese women 
giving birth to children in New Zealand in the period 1910 -1920.  This 
may be an area for further research for some future historian. 
 
The interviews therefore included people aged in their late 60s and early 70s 
because they fitted the criteria and were willing to talk.  Three of the older 
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
2
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 

(80+) interviewees were actually born in New Zealand but were taken back to 
China for a Chinese education and subsequently returned to New Zealand.  
Although they did not fit all three of the criteria, they were included because of 
their age and their willingness to share their experiences.  I am sure there are 
many more Chinese migrants from Jung Seng who could have been 
interviewed, but as they have not come forward or been recommended, my 
sample is limited to 12 interviews.  There are only 11 recordings as a mother 
and daughter interview was recorded on one tape.   
 
This is a step towards developing a record of stories from a part of New 
Zealand’s history that up till now, has been largely unspoken.  There is a 
period following the decline of goldmining in New Zealand, where Chinese 
spread out all over New Zealand to carry out business ventures in fruit shops, 
laundries, market gardens and importing-exporting businesses.  Children of 
poll tax payers often say they never heard their parents talk about the poll tax.  
There is a Chinese saying that people do not need to talk about “bitter things”.  
Perhaps this very Chinese attitude has a bearing on why such things were left 
unsaid.  Most of the poll tax payers have passed away now, but their children 
remember the family stories.  It is important that this period of life for Chinese 
in New Zealand is preserved for future generations of all New Zealanders to 
learn from. 
 
All through the poll tax apology and compensation discussions, there was 
encouragement from the Office of Ethnic Affairs and leaders of the Chinese 
community for Chinese descendents to give their views.  Not many people 
took the opportunity to put their written submissions to the Office of Ethnic 
Affairs although quite a few attended the information sessions.  Collectively, 
New Zealand Chinese are still reticent about expressing their views in public.   
 
Summary: 
1. 
Most of the people interviewed came (or returned) to NZ about 
the time of the Japanese invasion of China.  Several came as 
refugee children to be reunited with fathers who had gained 
residence in New Zealand. 
 
2. 
Many of the children travelled either alone, or with companions 
they did not know well.  They were put into the care of someone 
returning to New Zealand who was known to their father.   
 
3. 
Almost all mention the hostel where Chinese passengers stayed 
in Sydney in transit to New Zealand (Ging Narm Jang). 
 
4. 
Several of the male interviewees mention the 1940 Centennial 
Exhibition and that they had been taken to it. 
 
5. 
Most of the people talked about helping in the family business, 
which, for Jung Seng people, was usually a fruit and vegetable 
shop.  Most talked about hardships; of lack of what we would 
expect these days as “home comforts”.  Was the predominantly 
male household a factor in this? 
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
3
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 

 
6. 
Frugality, long hours and hard work were other features of life in 
those early days before the end of World War II.   
 
7. 
Social life centred on the Double Ten Sports tournaments or 
family get-togethers for Chinese people in the years between 
1940 -1955.   
 
8. 
Mention of the help given by non-Chinese New Zealanders in 
enabling the interviewees to learn English or to advise them on 
their futures was common. 
 
9. 
Some mention that they were not assisted to learn English at 
school and were put with the younger children in the lower 
classes.  Assistance with English as a second language 
depended on the teachers in the schools as it was not 
considered a requirement of the education system in those 
days. 
 
10. 
Some spoke of experiencing discrimination for being Chinese 
but that it did not hinder them.  In fact, it made them more 
assertive and considerate of others who were less able to stand 
up for themselves. 
 
11. 
Business and community involvement in later years was not 
limited to the family business.  In fact some quite entrepreneurial 
business ventures became part of the economic development of 
the Wellington business district and in other parts of New 
Zealand. 
 
12. 
Discussion of professions such as teaching and electrical 
engineering also shed some interesting information about the 
development of the professions in New Zealand’s history.   
 
Findings from the interviews. 
 
Most of the people interviewed came to New Zealand at the time the New 
Zealand government allowed relatives of Chinese in New Zealand, who had 
citizenship or permanent residence, to join their fathers or brothers in New 
Zealand.  The young sons and daughters of people from the Jung Seng 
districts travelled mostly with close relatives, village kinsfolk, or with people 
their parents knew in New Zealand.  The journey by boat with its associated 
seasickness and crowded conditions did not seem to have had any harmful 
effects on the young children and most seemed to enjoy their first taste of 
non-Chinese food and the experiences of transition from Hong Kong to 
Sydney and then on to New Zealand.  Another interesting finding was the 
reference to the 1940 Exhibition.  Many of the interviewees recall being taken 
as youngsters to the exhibition when they arrived.   
 
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
4
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 

Meeting up with fathers they had never seen or not remembered was 
apparently not as traumatic an experience as one would have thought.  It was 
obvious that the children, if they were of an age to understand, were told of 
their reason for going to New Zealand.  However, by all accounts, the fathers 
were happy to see their children and the children were treated warmly by their 
fathers on and after arrival.  References to Confucian values and obedience 
to parents were common.  Respect for elders and appreciation of the life they 
had to give up in China was evident.  These values in no small way 
contributed to deference to New Zealand ways and lack of opposition to 
aggression and injustice reported to be meted out to Chinese migrants. 
 
Memories of schooldays were mixed.  Recollections of school days in smaller 
centres and private schools indicated that there was positive discrimination 
towards Chinese students.  However, in public city schools, there was some 
name-calling and racist attitudes from other children.  Whenever younger 
Chinese children were tormented by their non-Chinese schoolmates, the older 
and bigger Chinese children would often protect them as they were from the 
same village families. 
 
Chinese young people were expected to assist in the family business.  Many 
spoke of going to school and coming home to work in the shop or in the 
garden.  When fathers retired or died, the boys would be expected to take 
over the family business and forego their own ambitions and anticipated 
careers.  There was no question about it.  Working in the family business 
involved hard labour and long hours.  Most recalled the frugality and lack of 
what today we would expect as home comforts but they attribute that as 
helping them to appreciate and use their money wisely today. 
 
However, some pushed the boundaries and had to suffer the criticism of their 
wider families when they did not agree to following in their father’s footsteps.  
The decisions were not always easy but for those who made that decision, 
ensuring that they succeeded in the career of their choice was of paramount 
importance.  Reference was often made of their fathers and families being 
proud of them later on when they had proved themselves in business or in 
their careers outside of the family business. 
 
In the area of business, those who had been associated with the fruit and 
vegetable retail business mentioned the auction system of the markets in the 
early days.  Although most had no formal qualifications in economics, they all 
ran profitable business with many innovations in marketing and business 
practice.  For those that went into professions, their being Chinese was not a 
limiting factor to study and success in their chosen professions.  It made them 
more determined to succeed and to work twice as hard to fulfil their goals.  
Although there may have been latent racism, they were capable of turning 
potentially discriminatory situations to their advantage without being 
confrontational.  Their accounts of their own development mirrors the 
development of those professions and shed interesting insights into 
professional practices carried out at the time in New Zealand.   
 
 
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
5
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 

Conclusion 
 
The people interviewed grew up in a New Zealand that rewarded conformist 
behaviour. The Chinese in New Zealand have been described as a model 
minority, now sometimes expressed as a derogatory term implying that they 
were passive and compliant.  It is not surprising that such behaviour was 
attributed to the Chinese in New Zealand and was seen to be the norm.  Non-
conformist behaviour and attitudes impeded social acceptance.  Previous 
Chinese migrants had weathered, according to reports, abuse and 
discrimination during the gold-mining and subsequent poll tax imposition in 
the C19th.  Chinese stood out because of the way they looked, their language 
and their world views.  Family stories and admonitions to be cautious in the 
Westerners’ world were handed down through generations to protect the 
young ones from perceived dangers within the host community.   
 
Were these fears justified?  Were all Chinese discriminated against?  Did 
every Chinese individual experience anti-Chinese sentiments in their day to 
day existence?  Why did the Chinese community in New Zealand not retaliate 
and stand up for themselves?  Newspaper stories of the early days of 
Chinese in New Zealand have highlighted the negative aspects of cultural 
differences.  By the beginning of the C20th several Chinese families with large 
kinship networks were resident in New Zealand and many of the older 
Chinese families with links to the Tung Jung district had New Zealand born 
children.  What has been written about how these families went about their 
daily lives?  Although not recorded on tape, one of the interviewees recalled 
when her father’s shop caught fire; the local townspeople stood below the 
second story window and caught the children as they were thrown down to 
safety. Is this story congruent with anti-Chinese sentiment? 
 
If you drill down to the individual level, Chinese people were far from passive 
and compliant in their approach to living in New Zealand.  They adapted their 
lives and lived comfortably in two worlds, overcoming language problems, 
while maintaining their family values and respect for their communities.  This 
facility to move between worlds gave them advantages in their business and 
professional lives.  This is evident in the interviews that I have had the 
privilege to record.   
 
The chain migration pattern of the poll tax payers and their descendents is 
obvious from these interviews.  People came to New Zealand because their 
relatives had sought a better life than one they could have expected had they 
stayed in China.  Most of those interviewed acknowledged the difficulties their 
families had experienced in coming to New Zealand but felt that they were 
better people for having been through those experiences.  None regretted the 
fact that they had come to New Zealand, although some of the older ones, if 
given the choice, would have loved to have returned to live in the China they 
remembered.  Most consider themselves New Zealanders, even though they 
were born in China.  All of them have succeeded in their businesses and 
careers and have given back to the communities in which they have lived and 
worked. 
 
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
6
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 

They are proud of their ethnic origins and feel they have had the best of both 
worlds.  Although they regret the gradual loss of language and some of the 
“old fashioned” values they were brought up with, they recognise that their 
children now think differently to them and consider themselves New 
Zealanders and act like other New Zealanders.  When questioned about 
whether they would have fared better in present day China or China after the 
Japanese invasion, most respond that they are thankful that they were 
brought to New Zealand by their fathers and their families.   
 
It is time for Chinese New Zealanders to acknowledge the benefits of living in 
New Zealand and to discard the victim mentality that has been perpetuated by 
those who would have us believe that Chinese in New Zealand continue to be 
second class citizens.  Of course there was animosity and discrimination in 
the early days of Chinese settlement in New Zealand but we should move on 
from there now.  Perpetuation of the victim mentality and dwelling on the 
grievances of the past will not enable Chinese to feel proud of what they have 
achieved in the space of three or four generations in New Zealand. 
 
Those who were born in China will never forget their heritage.  Those who 
were born in New Zealand cannot forget their heritage because they are and 
look Chinese.  Their forebears wanted to make a good life here.  They wanted 
their children and grandchildren to take up opportunities that were available in 
New Zealand.  As a community, Chinese in New Zealand have probably 
exceeded their forebears’ dreams for a better life.  The next generation of 
Chinese New Zealanders will not be passive bystanders. They have 
opportunities ahead to contribute positively to the future of New Zealand as 
New Zealand citizens by birth and by right.   
 
Living in New Zealand has helped shape our worldviews, which are different 
from the worldviews of our parents and grandparents.  Our challenge as oral 
historians is not only to assist people to recall the past in its entirety, the 
positive as well as the negative, but to help shape the future where Chinese in 
New Zealand openly participate and contribute to activities that affect their 
communities whether they are Chinese communities or wider New Zealand 
communities.   
 
[Recorded interviews can be accessed through the Oral History Centre of the 
Alexander Turnbull Library] 
 
 
 
 
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
7
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 

Tung Jung Oral History Interviews 
 
Criteria for selection of interviewees 
 
 
1.  Born in China  
 
 
2.  From the Tung Jung District in China 
 
 
3.  Arrived in New Zealand before 1940s 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Factors not considered when beginning the project
 
 
1.  The reticence of Chinese people to talk about their lives to someone 
who was not family.   
 
2.  The number of Chinese New Zealanders who were born in New 
Zealand in the 80-90 year age group.   
 
3.  Sample limited 
 
 
 
 
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
8
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 

Tung Jung Oral History Interviews 
 
Common threads 
 
 
•  Japanese invasion of China spurred migration 
 
•  Brought or came to New Zealand through family ties - marriage or 
blood 
 
•  Some travelled alone, some with kinfolk from same village and some 
with companions they did not know well   
 
•  Chinese passengers stayed in Sydney hostel in transit to New Zealand 
(Ging Narm Jang) 
 
•  The 1940 Centennial Exhibition in Wellington 
 
•  Helping in the family business - The predominantly male household 
 
•  Frugality, long hours and hard work 
 
•  The helpfulness of non-Chinese New Zealanders 
 
•  No assistance in helping to learn English at school - education system 
ignored the need 
 
•  Discrimination for being Chinese –positive and negative effects on 
people 
 
•  Social life - Double Ten Sports tournament, family gatherings, 
celebrations  
 
•  Entrepreneurial business ventures and community involvement in later 
years 
 
•  Personal professional developments mirror the development of the 
professions and industry in New Zealand’s history   
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
9
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 

Interviewees for the Tung Jung Oral History Project 

Name 
Village 
To NZ 

Chan, Janet  
Har Gee 
Came to NZ in 1939 
(nee Jiang) 
 
Has been back several 
and  
 
times.  
Wong, Yvonne 
Came to NZ in 1939.  
(nee Chan) 
Married to Fred Wong 

Gee (Louie), Sommee  
Sar Tou  
Came to NZ 1941 - went 
 (nee Wong Nam) 
(Sha Tou, or 
back to China in 1988 and 
Wong Sha Tou) 
2004. 

Kan, Wai Kai 
Sar Tou 
Born in China.  Came out to 
NZ aged 16.  Went back to 
Hong Kong several times.  
Now aged 101. 

Leong, Tom 
Peng Dee 
Came in 1939- went back 
 
to China in 1984 for a short 
visit. 

Moon, Harry 
Ar Yiew  
Came in 1939, returned to 
(Ng) 
(Ngar Yiu) 
China in 1948, returned NZ 
1949, visited China in 1955, 
1999. 

Wong, Betty  
Sun Gai 
Born in NZ- went to China 
(nee Chan or Chang) 
as a baby -returned to NZ 
in 1936. 

Wong, Bill 
Gwa Liang 
Born in New Zealand 1922- 
went to China aged 9, 
returned to NZ aged 15 
(1937).  Returned to China 
in 1986 and 1991. 

Wong, Fred  
Sar Tou 
Came to NZ 1939 - has 
never been back. 
 

Wong, Jim 
Bark Shek 
Came in 1939 – never 
returned to China until 
retirement.   
10  Wong, Ray 
Gwa Liang 
Born in NZ- went to China 
aged 14 –returned to NZ in 
1936. 
11  Young, Roy 
Peng Dee 
Came in 1939 - returned to 
China in 1945, then 
returned to NZ in 1949-50. 
 
 
 
Kitty Chang  August 2004 
10
An edited version of this paper was published in: 
 Oral History in New Zealand Volume Sixteen 2004  
National Oral History Association of New Zealand 

Discuss This Topic

There are 0 comments in this discussion.

join this discussion